Outta Line

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Slippery Tip #4: Create an outline

To do an outline or not is a point of contention among amateur writers. To me, this is a silly argument because everyone who writes a story does an outline – even if they don’t realize it. My view is that if you don’t think about your story and create some kind of “formal” outline and just start writing your story, this simply makes your first rough draft your outline – a very, very detailed outline.

Creating an outline for a porn story is super easy (at least it is if you do it like I do). It starts when you have that moment of insight – an idea for a dirty story that you just have to write. Don’t run straight to the computer – let the story live in your head for a little while. Play some of the scenes out in your mind like you’re watching a movie. Edit the scenes until they flow. Get to know your characters by watching them interact in your imagination. Jot down any traits, plot twists, or lines of dialogue that get you excited.

When you reach the point where you have to get the story out of your head and down on “paper,” gather any notes you’ve made and do your outline. At the very least, all you need to do is write one simple sentence for each scene in your story. This will allow you to create a basic structure for your story that will keep you on track and insure that you know where you going before you begin your journey. Having an idea for how your story is going to end is as important (if not more so) than knowing where it starts.

My idea is to write a story about a single mother who confesses to her son that she’s a sex addict. Here’s my quickie outline:

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Sex Addicted Mom (working title)

  • Mom talks to Son, tells him she’s a sex addict and her therapist told her to open up about it.
  • Son thinks about what Mom told him, gets horny and jerks off to fantasy of her.
  • Son offers support; Mom asks him to get rid of all her sex toys for her.
  • Son secretly keeps toys; plays with them while he jerks off to more graphic mom fantasies.
  • Mom tells Son she hasn’t had an orgasm in two days and she’s going crazy; Son gets turned on.
  • Son plays with toys more; accepts that he’s sexually attracted to Mom and plans to seduce her.
  • Son offers foot massage; Mom talks about her sex problems; Son makes move and they do oral.
  • Mom and Son go to bedroom and fuck every which way.
  • Twist – Son finds out Mom never went to a therapist; she was seducing him the whole time.

~ ~ ~

There, that doesn’t look too hard, now does it? These are just the bare bones, and provide enough of a framework to get you going. You can jump into the writing process with a good idea of where the story is going and how you’re going to get there. Like I said, this is the minimum. If you wanted to add a little more detail about some of the “beats” in the scene, along with some more information about character emotions, motivations, or actions, you can do a little more. This is what my expanded outline for this story might look like:

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Mom’s Addiction

SET UP

  • Scene 1: Distressed Mom sits Son down for awkward conversation – her therapist suggested she be open with those closest to her and tell them that she’s suffering from a serious problem: sex addiction. She admits that she’s a chronic masturbator and watches porn almost every night. Son is shocked, embarrassed, and a bit angry, though he really doesn’t know why.
  • Scene 2: Later that night, Son fumes in his bedroom over his mother’s admission. Begins thinking about his mother’s sexuality, admits to himself that he’s been suppressing his own shameful physical attraction to her since puberty. He ends up fantasizing about her masturbating to porn and jerks himself off.

DEVELOPMENT

  • Scene 3: Next day, Son apologizes to Mom for not being supportive. He asks if there is anything he can do to help. She talks more about her sex addiction, then reluctantly asks him to throw away some things for her since she can’t do it herself. He agrees and she turns over a big collection of sex toys.
  • Scene 4: That night, Son goes through the box of toys touching, tasting, and trying them out as he beats off to thoughts of these objects being in his mother’s pussy. Feels guilty and disgusted with himself.
  • Scene 5: Mom is upset, Son encourages her to talk. She hasn’t had an orgasm in two days and it’s driving her crazy, she’s dying for sex and willing to do anything or anyone. He tries to give her advice, but the bulge in his pants makes it difficult.
  • Scene 6: Son gives in to his urges and plays with mom’s toys again. Accepts that he is sexually attracted to his mother, and decides to take advantage of her sex addiction to seduce her.

CLIMAX

  • Scene 6: Mom is really stressed, Son offers foot massage to relax her. Mom talks about how hard it is not to masturbate and how she misses her toys. Conversation and massage become more intimate until Son makes his move and they give each other oral.
  • Scene 7: In Mom’s bedroom, they strip down and go at it in every position for the rest of the day and most of the night. Mom tells Son that she’d be able to give up masturbation and porn if he fucked her like that a few times a week. Son happily agrees.
  • Scene 8: Twist – Son somehow discovers that his mom never went to a therapist, she made the whole thing up. It turns out he wasn’t the one who seduced her, but the other way around!

~ ~ ~

Again, not all that much work, but I have a very good idea of what’s going to happen in each scene, what the purpose of the scene is (both on its own and as part of the big picture), and a sense of how these characters transition from mother and son to lovers. If something doesn’t work, I’ll most likely be able to spot it at this stage where it will be much easier to fix than after I’ve written 3,000 words and realize there’s a problem and have to start over.

A big complaint by anti-outliners is that if they plan things out they lose the creative spontaneity of discovering the story as they write it. This is crapola! There’s a great deal of creativity that goes into making a good outline, which is just as exciting as writing. Also, there’s no rule that says you have to adhere strictly to the outline. If you’re in the middle of a scene and a great idea pops into your head, you’re free to pursue it. Filling in the details of an outlined scene is where real the action is, and there’s nothing in an outline that impinges on the thrill of creating a story.

There’s a lot more to say on this topic, but this is enough for our purposes. Think about your story, make an outline, write your story. These steps are critical to completing the creative phase of conjuring your erotic tale while minimizing frustration and maximizing fun.

If you still don’t want to make an outline, try doing one while naked and imagining me leaning over your shoulder helping you along as I rub my stiff nipples against your bare shoulder. If that doesn’t work, then you’re a lost cause!

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16 thoughts on “Outta Line

  1. Thanks Rachael, very good advises from you!

    And even your little outline story got me excited! I can just see the ending of the tale:
    Son overhears his mother talking on the phone. She tells someone that her plan to seduce her son did work out. This shocks the son, but he is even more shocked when he realises that she is talking to her twin sister, his beloved aunt…
    And this is where episode two will eventually start :-)

    Thanks again and kisses,
    Markus

  2. Great concept! Seems easy enough to finish it into a full story?- not until AFTER the next Open Door installment of course.

  3. Rachael,
    Thanks for the advice. I just started my story. I’m going to take my time with it and, hopefully, have something worth reading. I love your writing style and hope “stylistic plagiarism” is not a thing.
    And Markus! My man! When is your story coming out?! ;)
    Thanks always,
    Michael

  4. AMichael: No worries about stylistic plagiarism! A lot of authors start out trying to write like someone else and naturally develop their own style along the way. All that matters is that you write, keep writing, and then write some more!

  5. I must say, beyond your already considerable talent as a writer, you are also a very gifted teacher. You explain things naturally and with an easy confidence that I find very encouraging.

    Plus, you’re hot and I’ve always had a thing for teachers. Can I be teacher’s pet? You can keep me under your desk all day. I’m a very good boy… most of the time.

  6. @Arturo: But, sweetie, if I kept you under my desk then you’d be able to look up my skirt and see that I don’t wear panties, which would…Oh, now I get what you’re up to – you little scamp!

  7. This was a really great post Rachel…Saved me having to buy Steven King’s book On Writing…

  8. @Bootdevil: I liked S.K.’s book, but he doesn’t advocate outlines – which, to me, is a little like a professional trapeze artist telling everyone that since she doesn’t need a net that no one else should bother using one. (Maybe she just wants to cut down on the competition from up and coming trapeze artists!)

  9. Oh yes, Stephen King. He said that during writing the Dark Tower books, he didn’t knew if Roland and his ka-tet will make it to the Dark Tower…

  10. I program for a living. I cannot go into a new piece of software or program or even a procedure without have an idea of what it needs – the input, the expected output. Pseudocode is what you just did, Rachael. I didn’t know you were a nerd, too ;)

  11. Besides being one of the most erotic and gifted women on the Internet, you’re also a great writing teacher. Trust me when I say this.

  12. Very sound advice Rachael. I haven’t gone to the point of writing down the plot points so in that sense you’re more disciplined. But I do try to think out the overall plot structure and then fill in details of how they get from A to B etc. I do like your writing tips.

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